We believe in
coral reefs.

Millions of people and species of wildlife depend on coral reefs. While climate change threatens their future, science shows that corals can adapt and survive if we keep them healthy.

Credit: Shaun Wolfe / Ocean Image Bank

Cutting-edge Science. Community Engagement.

For nearly 30 years, we have combined cutting-edge science and community engagement to reduce direct threats to reefs and to promote scalable and effective solutions for their protection.

Credit: Roatan Marine Park

Impact Globally, Regionally, & Locally

We employ a variety of conservation approaches and engage diverse communities around the world to save coral reefs.

It Can Happen

Coral reefs can adapt to climate change. If together we take the right actions, they can evolve and thrive for generations to come.

25%

of all marine life depends
on coral reefs

500M

people depend on coral reefs for food, income, and coastal protection

$375B

in services comes from coral reefs
each year

Featured Profile

Meet Manuel Mejia

For our Hawai’i Regional Program Director, Manuel Mejia, protecting coral reefs is about more than just the corals. We recently had the opportunity to sit down with him and dive in to this passion a little more.

Why Donors Choose CORAL: Jackson

Meet Jackson, one of CORAL’s youngest donors. He held a lemonade stand in his hometown and donated the proceeds to save coral reefs. Learn why Jackson gives back to our alliance. Q: What motivates you to give to CORAL? A: So that I can raise money to help save the coral reefs. Q: Excites you… Continue Reading →

Why Donors Choose CORAL: Bradley

Meet Bradley, a CORAL donor since 1998. Learn why he gives back to our alliance. Q: What motivates you to give to CORAL? A: The future of our reef ecosystems is vital to the sustainability of our planet. Every ecosystem has its nursery. Coral reefs are the ocean’s nursery. Q: What excites you about CORAL’s… Continue Reading →

Tela Bay’s 2021 Closed Fishing Season Shows Success

Tela Bay, Honduras—Recent monitoring data collected from Los Micos Lagoon demonstrated a 483 percent increase in fish biomass after a closed fishing season in 2021, signifying both higher quantities and larger sizes of fish. Likewise, it showed an increase in diversity of species and trophic levels.  Los Micos Lagoon often suffers from overfishing, impacting populations… Continue Reading →

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